ClimateTechWiki

An online clean technology database
A (7) | B (18) | C (23) | D (3) | E (20) | F (4) | G (4) | H (8) | I (10) | L (11) | M (6) | N (4) | O (8) | P (5) | R (14) | S (16) | T (4) | U (1) | V (1) | W (6)
Ocean energy: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion © Climate Tech Wiki - acc and respective owners

Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients.  Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

Ocean Energy: Salinity gradient for electricity generation © ClimateTechWiki and respective owners

Five basic forms of ocean energy can be harvested for to generate electricity and fresh water by various means: a) tide energy; b) wave energy; c) tidal currents; d)

Ocean energy: Tidal barrage © Climate Tech Wiki - acc and respective owners

Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients.  Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

Ocean energy: Tidal stream © Climate Tech Wiki - acc and respective owners

Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients.  Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

Ocean energy: Wave energy © Climate Tech Wiki - acc and respective owners

Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients.  Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

Off-field crop residue management © ClimateTechWiki and respective owners

Crop-residue management is an important mitigation technology using biomass, vermi-compost etc. processed under aerobic conditions which is being utilised as a commercial option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Vermi-composting is a modified method of composting using earthworms to eat and digest farm waste and turn it into a high quality vermi-compost in two months or less. It is different from other composts due to the presence of worms such as earthworms, red wigglers, white worms etc. (Satavik, 2011).

Optimising aviation © Climate Tech Wiki - acc and respective owners

Improved air traffic management techniques like to avoid flying holding patterns, “green landings” and the use of relatively low speed airplanes for domestic aviation can reduce the emission of greenhouse gases substantially. Depending on their penetration up to 3% CO2 emission reduction can be achieved for green landings and 10-60% CO2 emission reduction for low speed airplanes. Moreover, these techniques will lower the NOx and soot emissions, thereby improving the air quality around the airport.

Organic agriculture © ClimateTechWiki and respective owners

Organic agriculture is a production system which avoids or largely excludes the use of synthetic fertilisers, pesticides and growth regulators. It can sequester carbon using crop rotations, crop residues, animal manure, legumes, green manure, and off-farm organic waste (Lampkin et al., 1999). It can also reduce carbon emissions by avoiding the use of fossil fuels used in the manufacture of the chemicals used to make synthetic materials.